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Posts tagged 1920s

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We have fun.

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whataboutbobbed:

Louise Brooks is A Social Celebrity (1926)

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treadmill-to-oblivion:

A friendly game of hockey in bathing suits in Minneapolis, 1925. (Via)

treadmill-to-oblivion:

A friendly game of hockey in bathing suits in Minneapolis, 1925. (Via)

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Daniel Goldmark shares some of his best homegrown Cleveland sheet music finds in the latest issue of Belt.

Daniel Goldmark shares some of his best homegrown Cleveland sheet music finds in the latest issue of Belt.

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Prohibition-era bar in a shed, part 3. #latergram

Prohibition-era bar in a shed, part 3. #latergram

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Prohibition-era bar in a shed, part 2. #latergram

Prohibition-era bar in a shed, part 2. #latergram

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Prohibition-era bar in a shed. #latergram

Prohibition-era bar in a shed. #latergram

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Washington, D.C., 1926. “Dancers — chorus girl using electric massage vibrator.” (via Good Vibrations: 1926 | Shorpy Historical Photo Archive)

Washington, D.C., 1926. “Dancers — chorus girl using electric massage vibrator.” (via Good Vibrations: 1926 | Shorpy Historical Photo Archive)

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Speakeasy business cards.
Source: the Time-Life series This Fabulous Century.

Speakeasy business cards.

Source: the Time-Life series This Fabulous Century.

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Early color film from 1922: Actresses vamp for the camera

These test clips, showcasing Kodak’s innovations in film and color processing, are not just enjoyable but positively hypnotizing.

Even more interesting to a modern viewer are the women’s gestures. They act out fluttery, innocent modesty; warm maternal love; and in the longest sequence, sexy, puckered-lip vamping. Their open expressions of feeling and the particular way they move their hands and tilt their heads, even more than the fashions of their clothes and makeup, immediately mark them as women of the interwar period. Recently a Russian film scholar, Oksana Bulgakowa, has shown how various feelings and meanings were coded in the gestures of early film actors. Some of these are so unfamiliar now, they seem like a foreign language. 

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micropolisnyc:

The dramatically dilapidated Loews King Theatre, on Flatbush Avenue, is set for a resurrection.

The place was built in 1929. A young Barbra Streisand once worked here. So did Sylvester Stallone.

It’s been closed since 1977, but it’s still the largest indoor theater in Brooklyn, with 3,200 seats. I got to walk around inside yesterday, and despite all the dust and decay, it’s pretty spectacular.

The plan is to restore its former grandeur, and turn it into a major performing arts center. Opening set for 2015.

As a former Brooklynite, I should confess: I’m a little envious.

I’ve been following this story for the past year or so with major excitement. Can’t wait to see this theater — and to see it in use again.

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Mackay was a quintessential ‘It Girl’ of her era, and accounts of her ball were written up in all the society papers. She viewed the society matchmaking game with some trepidation, but also with amusement. (In ‘Girls’ terms, she was raised to be a Marnie, but quickly learned to embrace her inner Jessa.)

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"I thought a lot about the risks of the inherent old-timeyness of a songbook. I know I have friends who will dismiss it as a stylistic indulgence, a gimmick. There’s a way of miniaturizing and neutralizing the past, encasing it in a quaint, retro irrelevancy and designating it as something only fit for curiosity-seekers or revivalists. But although the present moment can exclude the past from relevance, it can’t erase its influence entirely. Each era finds something new to return to; things that seemed out of date have a way of coming back in new forms, and revealing aspects of themselves we might not have noticed before." (via Song Reader: Beck Revives the Romance of Sheet Music with 26 Illustrated Songs | Brain Pickings)
This makes me VERY HAPPY indeed. I’m a sometime collector of old sheet music for all these reasons and more. I’ve got to get my grubby paws on this songbook.

"I thought a lot about the risks of the inherent old-timeyness of a songbook. I know I have friends who will dismiss it as a stylistic indulgence, a gimmick. There’s a way of miniaturizing and neutralizing the past, encasing it in a quaint, retro irrelevancy and designating it as something only fit for curiosity-seekers or revivalists. But although the present moment can exclude the past from relevance, it can’t erase its influence entirely. Each era finds something new to return to; things that seemed out of date have a way of coming back in new forms, and revealing aspects of themselves we might not have noticed before." (via Song Reader: Beck Revives the Romance of Sheet Music with 26 Illustrated Songs | Brain Pickings)

This makes me VERY HAPPY indeed. I’m a sometime collector of old sheet music for all these reasons and more. I’ve got to get my grubby paws on this songbook.