Posts tagged books

34 Notes

My friend Allen Crawford has done a beautiful, wonderful thing and I can’t wait to get my hands on it.

23 Notes

togatherinc:

We’re super excited that author and Iron Chef America judge Michael Ruhlman recently joined Togather because it will give him more opportunities to share his unique culinary sensibility with readers everywhere — online and in person!  Michael is based in Cleveland, but he’s interested in both live and videochat events, which you can start lining up here.  Everyone from ambitious home cooks to culinary professionals is drooling over his new book  Ruhlman’s Twenty: 20 Techniques, 100 Recipes, a Cook’s Manifesto.  In it, Michael distills his decades of training into twenty simple techniques that will change the way anyone cooks. Interested in sharpening your cooking skills, or hosting your own “Iron Chef” style competition? Bring Michael to your town!  You might learn how to make homemade prosciutto. Or maybe you could turn your next book club meeting into an excuse to chat with Michael on Google Hangout while he helps you roast a chicken. Go on, propose an event. It’s sure to be delicious.

Could not be more psyched that fellow Cleveland native Michael Ruhlman is on our site! People, do cool stuff with him! He is so nice and so smart!

togatherinc:

We’re super excited that author and Iron Chef America judge Michael Ruhlman recently joined Togather because it will give him more opportunities to share his unique culinary sensibility with readers everywhere — online and in person!  Michael is based in Cleveland, but he’s interested in both live and videochat events, which you can start lining up here.  Everyone from ambitious home cooks to culinary professionals is drooling over his new book  Ruhlman’s Twenty: 20 Techniques, 100 Recipes, a Cook’s Manifesto.  In it, Michael distills his decades of training into twenty simple techniques that will change the way anyone cooks. 

Interested in sharpening your cooking skills, or hosting your own “Iron Chef” style competition? Bring Michael to your town!  You might learn how to make homemade prosciutto. Or maybe you could turn your next book club meeting into an excuse to chat with Michael on Google Hangout while he helps you roast a chicken. Go on, propose an event. It’s sure to be delicious.

Could not be more psyched that fellow Cleveland native Michael Ruhlman is on our site! People, do cool stuff with him! He is so nice and so smart!

6 Notes

togatherinc:

Breaking news! Togather has been chosen as one of the 2013 SXSW Interactive Accelerator finalists!

We’ll be hanging out in the Accelerator Showcase at the Austin Hilton on Monday, March 12 and Tuesday, March 13, along with all the other awesome finalists.

Wanna meet for breakfast tacos and margaritas? We’ll see you there.

Guys. Guys. This is exciting. (I work at this place.)

P.S. I “do” our Tumblr now, so if you love reading and books and cool events and want to help authors keep being awesome, you should maybe follow it.

2 Notes

Togather: The Togather Holiday Gift Guide

togatherinc:

Eek! Did you realize that it’s less than two weeks until Christmas? Though it’s been a busy month for us here at Togather, we never stop thinking about books. So we thought we’d share some of our holiday book recommendations —things we want to gift our family, our best friends, and even a few…

My team (including me) tell you about the books we’re sweatin’ for the holidays. Also, the books we’re giving to people. Shh, don’t tell my little bro.

6 Notes

Togather: Emily Gould to Speak at Author Support Group

togatherinc:

image

We’re thrilled to have writer Emily Gould join us for our second Author Support Group Meetup — Navigating the Shift to Digital — on Wednesday, December 12 at Lolita Bar in Manhattan’s Lower East Side.

Emily’s career has spanned both sides of the digital-print “divide”. She’s perhaps best…

We’re pretty psyched about this. Writers, wannabe authors, people who think Emily is awesome — come join us, won’t you?!

9 Notes

The New York City Public TransLit Book Club

togatherinc:

A while back we heard about a program in Seattle that encourages commuters to read more. It’s called “Books on the Bus” and it’s hailed as ‘the first-ever book club for commuters.’ And since imitation is the highest form of flattery, we figured we should try to bring something like that to New York.

So we created The Public TransLit Book Club! And while we certainly drew our inspiration from the group in Seattle, we take our book club a little further. We’re bringing the author to an event where they will speak with the book club!!  That’s right! Not only will we all be reading the same book as we schlep to work. We’ll also be rubbing elbows with the authors, too! 

Our first event is at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, December 11 at Lolita Bar in Manhattan. The first selection is “This Machine Kills Secrets” by Andy Greenberg.  In order to RSVP to this event, just buy a book through Togather. This will act as your ticket to the event and will also get you one free drink at the event! And, don’t worry about the designated driver. You can always take public transit home!

To learn more about future events, check out our Meetup page!

Check out this cool thing my company is doing. THEN MAYBE THINK ABOUT JOINING, MAYBE? It will be fun. You can read about hackerz and cypherpunks and then talk to Andy Greenberg, the author, himself!

6 Notes

The 12 Best/Worst Celebrity Memoirs

togatherinc:

You see what he did there? The hallmark of any great memoir title is wordplay!

Sometimes a hyphen can really make all the difference.

You see, because not only is Lance out of the band, but also….

Well, I’m certainly not creeped out by all the children on this book’s cover. THAT’S FOR SURE!

You heard the lady. Also, please have a look at the tile of her other book mentioned on the cover.

What exactly are you talking about, Todd Bridges? Read this book to find out!

We get it, Regis. You’re in demand! Or you were around the time “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire” came out.

I know we’re not done with the list yet. But, this is the best title.

Literally everyone gets to write a memoir.

Like, literally everyone.

Even people who are made up.

Of all the books featured in this blog post, this is the one I am most likely to read. Having said that, there is no way I am going to read any of the books featured in this blog post.

KILLING WILLIS??

Also the Colonel Sanders one is perfect.

21 Notes

rachelfershleiser:

“But my favorite job was at Housing Works, where I stood at the sluice gates of the incoming book donations and was tasked with judging which ones would be elevated to the shelves on the book floor. Housing Works is a fascinating case study, because its floor inventory and its online inventory (also housed in the building’s basements) are separate entities. It’s almost like two bookstores in one—the first for browsing and surfing the serendipity of the stacks, the second for title-searched Internet ordering. On average there, thirty per cent of book sales are made in person and the remainder are made online. A book sorter needs to keep this ratio in mind when determining whether a book should go to the book floor or to the online division. Apart from that consideration, he follows his own lights. Here, for the curious, are some of the precepts that guided me.
I have always thought that the backbone of a good used-book store is formed by its fiction and history sections, so whenever possible I separated these books for the floor. Naturally, there were exceptions. Specialized histories with a narrow scholarly focus are better sold online—so a history of the Punic Wars makes it to the store; a study of urinals during the reign of Hadrian doesn’t. In fiction, forgotten midlist titles from the nineteen-eighties and nineties tend to molder on the shelves, while, oddly, forgotten midlist titles from the seventies or earlier exert a kind of retro fascination and are more likely to sell to someone off the street.”
(via The Bookstore Brain: How Bookstores Choose Their Books : The New Yorker)
By Sam Sacks, with whom I sold books for years, as volunteers, staff members, and post-staff hangers-on. I miss his face.

Bookstores are special places.

rachelfershleiser:

“But my favorite job was at Housing Works, where I stood at the sluice gates of the incoming book donations and was tasked with judging which ones would be elevated to the shelves on the book floor. Housing Works is a fascinating case study, because its floor inventory and its online inventory (also housed in the building’s basements) are separate entities. It’s almost like two bookstores in one—the first for browsing and surfing the serendipity of the stacks, the second for title-searched Internet ordering. On average there, thirty per cent of book sales are made in person and the remainder are made online. A book sorter needs to keep this ratio in mind when determining whether a book should go to the book floor or to the online division. Apart from that consideration, he follows his own lights. Here, for the curious, are some of the precepts that guided me.

I have always thought that the backbone of a good used-book store is formed by its fiction and history sections, so whenever possible I separated these books for the floor. Naturally, there were exceptions. Specialized histories with a narrow scholarly focus are better sold online—so a history of the Punic Wars makes it to the store; a study of urinals during the reign of Hadrian doesn’t. In fiction, forgotten midlist titles from the nineteen-eighties and nineties tend to molder on the shelves, while, oddly, forgotten midlist titles from the seventies or earlier exert a kind of retro fascination and are more likely to sell to someone off the street.”

(via The Bookstore Brain: How Bookstores Choose Their Books : The New Yorker)

By Sam Sacks, with whom I sold books for years, as volunteers, staff members, and post-staff hangers-on. I miss his face.

Bookstores are special places.

399 Notes

And speaking of “Steve” Colbert, I pulled this amazingness from a different Buzzfeed comment thread: Stephen Colbert as a small-town stripper in a shot from his book Wigfield, co-written with Amy Sedaris and Paul Dinello in 2003.
I mean. He is gorgeous! GORGEOUS. This may top Dave Foley.

And speaking of “Steve” Colbert, I pulled this amazingness from a different Buzzfeed comment thread: Stephen Colbert as a small-town stripper in a shot from his book Wigfield, co-written with Amy Sedaris and Paul Dinello in 2003.

I mean. He is gorgeous! GORGEOUS. This may top Dave Foley.

40 Notes

theparisreview:

Selected from the AbeBooks’ Weird Book Room.

New favorite website.

theparisreview:

Selected from the AbeBooks’ Weird Book Room.

New favorite website.

36 Notes

housingworksbookstore:

emmastraub:

Watch Dan Wilbur and I challenge JK Rowling to a quidditch match. You’re going DOWN, Rowling. Sort of. Maybe. Probably not. And I love you. 

“No, no, you’re supposed to be like, mean.” THIS IS THE BEST! Also, Dan, are you wearing a Housing Works t-shirt!?!

Emma and Dan? Doing stuff? Together? Woo!

3 Notes

I sure did love this book. (Taken with Instagram)

I sure did love this book. (Taken with Instagram)

99 Notes


“As played by Weaver, Janey seems to envision herself as New Canaan, Connecticut’s resident femme fatale. From the way she moves and flirts, you can see her awareness of her own physicality and sexuality, yet when confronted by the burgeoning sexuality of her kids and their friends, she is at a loss.”

Love this book and this movie. One of the rare times a story is told irresistibly well in both forms.

“As played by Weaver, Janey seems to envision herself as New Canaan, Connecticut’s resident femme fatale. From the way she moves and flirts, you can see her awareness of her own physicality and sexuality, yet when confronted by the burgeoning sexuality of her kids and their friends, she is at a loss.”

Love this book and this movie. One of the rare times a story is told irresistibly well in both forms.

753 Notes

rachelfershleiser:

unypl:

“By Grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept,” by Elizabeth Smart 
Read By Grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept
The train was waiting and she was sitting there reading. I saw her through the open doors. I walked in, took a seat infront of her, and I photographed her. She became aware of me after I took the shot. Instinctively, I knew that her awareness was informed. She looked up and asked, “Are you the underground?”. I hesitated for a moment, as I wondered myself if I was the underground. Then I quickly said yes. She took my hand and held it, so warmly, like we were already connected. I’ll never forget it. That moment will be a part of me. It will enrich my work. Thank you. 

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Awesome!

rachelfershleiser:

unypl:

“By Grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept,” by Elizabeth Smart 

Read By Grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept

The train was waiting and she was sitting there reading. I saw her through the open doors. I walked in, took a seat infront of her, and I photographed her. She became aware of me after I took the shot. Instinctively, I knew that her awareness was informed. She looked up and asked, “Are you the underground?”. I hesitated for a moment, as I wondered myself if I was the underground. Then I quickly said yes. She took my hand and held it, so warmly, like we were already connected. I’ll never forget it. That moment will be a part of me. It will enrich my work. Thank you. 

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Awesome!

6399 Notes

millionsmillions:

Top: Catcher in the Rye

Bottom: Moby Dick

Taken from Fictitious Dishes, a series of meals from novels cooked and photographed by graphic artist Dinah Fried.