Posts tagged film

8457 Notes

5 Notes

So I watched CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG for the first time ever this weekend. I am thirty years old. I appreciated it so much and I’m so thankful I could, at my age. There are a lot of kids movies that don’t really work unless you see them for the first time at the age they’re “meant” for, then you can relive the feelings as a grown person even though they’ll never be quite the same. 

However, I’m miffed at my parents and for all adults in my life for never sitting me down and showing it to me as a kid. I really feel like I missed out on something major. This movie is adorable and lovely and fantastic and sweet and funny and even has good messages for wide-eyed kids, and I love Dick Van Dyke forever and ever, and he’s just not allowed to die, sorry.

I wonder if it’s because it came out in 1968, when my parents were about 15 and 16, and they were firmly outside the target demographic for this film, and they were so deep into their schmoopy selfish teenage rebellion worlds that they were like, “Pfft, that’s for babies” and then never got around to seeing it as adults, and then their own baby missed out for no good reason?

Anyway — this song in particular, You Two, which comes along shortly after the film begins, actually made me cry big hot streaming tears over my tea and croissant on Saturday morning. Of course, I would never have had this kind of reaction as a child. I felt so emotional over this sweet, simple sequence in a way I only could have experienced as an adult, considering babies of my own, and, as always, totally melting for a dad showing this kind of love for his children.

16 Notes

pbump:

Watching Ghostbusters, noticed the fake Ghostbusters-related cover of the venerable Atlantic Monthly — now The Atlantic, and my employer once-removed. 

Figured I’d see what the actual cover for that and the other three magazines depicted looked like in October 1984, the month all of this supernatural excitement supposedly occurred. They are depicted. (Omni ceased publication a decade ago.)

The newspapers weren’t as easy to uncover, perhaps understandably. But two notes. One, the Globe is the tabloid Globe, in a pre-hyperactive front-page era. Two, its other banner headline was wrong. Diana gave birth the previous month.

2161 Notes

Wes Anderson, Luke Wilson, and Owen Wilson during the production of Bottle Rocket (1996)

From The Wes Anderson Collection

163 Notes

laughingsquid:

The Fifth Estate, A Film About WikiLeaks and Julian Assange

I canNOT keep a straight face watching this trailer. I like him, but has Cumberbatch jumped the shark? Can I even use that phrase any more?

laughingsquid:

The Fifth Estate, A Film About WikiLeaks and Julian Assange

I canNOT keep a straight face watching this trailer. I like him, but has Cumberbatch jumped the shark? Can I even use that phrase any more?

1 Notes

Now manifested in GIFs, Vines, supercuts, music samples, instant replays, and endless other formats, The Loop has become the preeminent narrative device of our time. But ‘narrative’ might not be an accurate term, as The Loop has a tenuous relationship to storytelling. Movies have a beginning, a middle, and an end, whereas The Loop is all-at-once. Movies are arrows, but The Loop is a circle.
Rex Sorgatz, View Source: Trapped in the Loop on Tribeca Film Festival’s Future of Film blog.

70 Notes

More important than allowing women to prove they can hack it with the boys is for the industry to recognize what women have already accomplished: to put as much effort into developing female audiences, for there are many, as into wooing geeks at Comic-Con, and to realize that The Heat’s $40 million (and counting) box-office take is not a fluke but a window into a hunger that Hollywood is doing a lousy job of feeding.

—Sam Adams, new editor of Indiewire’s Criticwire blog (and soon-to-be Dissolve contributor), responding to Susan Wloszczyna’s provocative piece at RogerEbert.com about why Hollywood should be handing the reins of blockbuster franchises to female directors. (via thedissolve)

Yes please.

And: hooray! The Dissolve is launching today. Sometime.

14 Notes

Made in Cleveland, showing in Cleveland-area cinemas starting this Friday, is an anthology film of vignettes by 11 Cleveland filmmakers, starring Clevelanders, shot on location all over Cleveland (plus lots of Lakewood locations, what what!). Local news personalities Leon Bibb and Robin Swoboda make appearances in dramatic roles, and guess who else is in it? Gillian Jacobs and Busy Phillips. Pretty rad, dudes.

Hope us Clevelanders in NYC get a chance to see this on the big screen.

2 Notes

For now, Ms. McCarthy has enough clout to spend part of her summer break making ‘Tammy,’ a comedy she wrote with Mr. Falcone and which he is directing, in which she plays an irresponsible woman on a road trip with her tough-as-nails grandmother (Susan Sarandon). Then she goes right onto another film, ‘St. Vincent De Van Nuys,’ which pits her against Bill Murray, one of her comedy idols.

15 Notes

thedorseyshawexperience:

who’s gonna play hillary?

Wow. Huh. I did a gut check and it told me Amanda Seyfried. (Sorry, but Scarlett is JUST NOT a good actor. Like…at all.)

2032 Notes

Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway practicing the kiss scene in Chinatown.

!!!

4 Notes

Early color film from 1922: Actresses vamp for the camera

These test clips, showcasing Kodak’s innovations in film and color processing, are not just enjoyable but positively hypnotizing.

Even more interesting to a modern viewer are the women’s gestures. They act out fluttery, innocent modesty; warm maternal love; and in the longest sequence, sexy, puckered-lip vamping. Their open expressions of feeling and the particular way they move their hands and tilt their heads, even more than the fashions of their clothes and makeup, immediately mark them as women of the interwar period. Recently a Russian film scholar, Oksana Bulgakowa, has shown how various feelings and meanings were coded in the gestures of early film actors. Some of these are so unfamiliar now, they seem like a foreign language. 

153 Notes

movieposteroftheday:

1969 German re-release poster for THE THIN MAN (W.S. Van Dyke, USA, 1934)
Designer: Berthold
Poster source: KinoArt.de
The German title translates as “The Untraceable.”

movieposteroftheday:

1969 German re-release poster for THE THIN MAN (W.S. Van Dyke, USA, 1934)

Designer: Berthold

Poster source: KinoArt.de

The German title translates as “The Untraceable.”

5 Notes

From 1970s starfucker Carole Mallory’s new memoir

Robert Deniro: “During lovemaking, he never stopped looking in my eyes. He had a butterfly tattoo that I later realized matched his flighty spirit. So did the fact he left his socks on.”

Peter Sellers: “I kissed him all over his hairy body. He had hair everywhere. He even had it on his back. I liked it. He reminded me of a giant panda bear.”

2141 Notes

micropolisnyc:

The dramatically dilapidated Loews King Theatre, on Flatbush Avenue, is set for a resurrection.

The place was built in 1929. A young Barbra Streisand once worked here. So did Sylvester Stallone.

It’s been closed since 1977, but it’s still the largest indoor theater in Brooklyn, with 3,200 seats. I got to walk around inside yesterday, and despite all the dust and decay, it’s pretty spectacular.

The plan is to restore its former grandeur, and turn it into a major performing arts center. Opening set for 2015.

As a former Brooklynite, I should confess: I’m a little envious.

I’ve been following this story for the past year or so with major excitement. Can’t wait to see this theater — and to see it in use again.