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106 Notes

livelymorgue:

Feb. 14, 1931: “She rivals the best of the masculine speedboat racers,” the picture’s caption reads. Loretta Turnbull of Monrovia, Calif., won “fifty trophies, forty-five of which were won in competition with men.” A few years later, when she received kidnapping threats at her home, her father, Rupert, boasted of the family’s prowess with guns. “Mr. Turnbull said he was turning his ranch into an armed camp,” The Times reported. “Loretta and her three brothers,” Mr. Turnbull was quoted as saying, “were all taught the use of firearms and how to shoot straight and rapidly. We feel that we are able to take care of ourselves.” Photo: The New York Times

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11 Notes

At Home in Brooklyn: The Nooney Brooklyn Photographs, 1978-1979

A Manhattanite by birth, Dinanda Nooney’s first photographic project (1974-76) was to document the entire length of the West Side Highway, which had partially collapsed in 1973 and was demolished beginning in 1977. The Getty Center acquired Nooney’s West Side archive, including negatives, prints, notes, and newspaper clippings.

Her second project, the documentation of Brooklyn, was much larger in scope. Nooney initially became interested in the borough in 1976, while working as a volunteer for George McGovern’s presidential campaign. Two years later, she used the connections she had made in order to gain access to rooftops and other vantage points for a survey of the borough. She soon became more interested in the people she met and began photographing families in their homes. Many of these sitters then recommended other potentially willing subjects.

Working almost daily from January 1978 to April 1979, she crisscrossed the borough, documenting the broad ethnic and economic range of Brooklyn’s residents. The portraits that emerge are striking in their attention to the details of architecture and décor, which reveal just as much about the subjects as how they choose to pose themselves for Nooney’s camera. This project was the subject of an exhibition, At Home in Brooklyn, at the Long Island Historical Society in 1985.

2 Notes

chiseler:

image

Another contender for ‘This should be the official uniform of Planet Earth’. Eyelashes included. -Jennifier Matsui

My love for old sheet music will never die. Burn on.

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The Brink of Oblivion: Inside Nazi-Occupied Poland, 1939-1940

Amazing color photos of Poles and Jews by Nazi photographer Hugo Jaeger.

76 Notes

claytoncubitt:

Yolandi and a Paul Richard skull, Brooklyn

claytoncubitt:

Yolandi and a Paul Richard skull, Brooklyn

888 Notes

hoodoothatvoodoo:

Arnold Genthe 1920

hoodoothatvoodoo:

Arnold Genthe 1920

15547 Notes


Candy Cigarette, 1989 by Sally Mann
Sally Mann’s famed body of work Immediate Family documents her three children, Emmett, Jessie and Virginia, in an array of scenes at their home in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia. Capturing them as they sleep, interact, dress up and role play. Mrs. Mann’s photographs highlight a heightened maturity that defies their age, creating a tension between the push of childhood and the pull of adulthood. Even when the scenes themselves are innocent, there is a knowing gaze from the subject that, in my opinion, charges the image itself.
In Candy Cigarette (1989), Mrs. Mann’s eldest daughter Jessie stares defiantly at the camera, at her mother, with tousled hair and a cigarette made of bubblegum. Something which I personally find rather fascinating in that photograph is that Jessie is exhibiting a self-awareness as both a female and also as a subject of her mother’s lens. While Mrs. Mann’s work has consistently come under public scrutiny for its intimate subject matter, at the root of her project, Immediate Family is a family album filled with the stories, memories and moments that define Sally Mann as a mother and as a photographer.

Candy Cigarette, 1989 by Sally Mann

Sally Mann’s famed body of work Immediate Family documents her three children, Emmett, Jessie and Virginia, in an array of scenes at their home in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia. Capturing them as they sleep, interact, dress up and role play. Mrs. Mann’s photographs highlight a heightened maturity that defies their age, creating a tension between the push of childhood and the pull of adulthood. Even when the scenes themselves are innocent, there is a knowing gaze from the subject that, in my opinion, charges the image itself.

In Candy Cigarette (1989), Mrs. Mann’s eldest daughter Jessie stares defiantly at the camera, at her mother, with tousled hair and a cigarette made of bubblegum. Something which I personally find rather fascinating in that photograph is that Jessie is exhibiting a self-awareness as both a female and also as a subject of her mother’s lens. While Mrs. Mann’s work has consistently come under public scrutiny for its intimate subject matter, at the root of her project, Immediate Family is a family album filled with the stories, memories and moments that define Sally Mann as a mother and as a photographer.

4 Notes

The Time I Shot Andy Warhol - NYTimes.com

girlhattan:

here is a story i wrote about the time i shot andy warhol

Super cool.

6395 Notes

millionsmillions:

Top: Catcher in the Rye

Bottom: Moby Dick

Taken from Fictitious Dishes, a series of meals from novels cooked and photographed by graphic artist Dinah Fried.