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6 Notes

Togather: Emily Gould to Speak at Author Support Group

togatherinc:

image

We’re thrilled to have writer Emily Gould join us for our second Author Support Group Meetup — Navigating the Shift to Digital — on Wednesday, December 12 at Lolita Bar in Manhattan’s Lower East Side.

Emily’s career has spanned both sides of the digital-print “divide”. She’s perhaps best…

We’re pretty psyched about this. Writers, wannabe authors, people who think Emily is awesome — come join us, won’t you?!

6 Notes

The 12 Best/Worst Celebrity Memoirs

togatherinc:

You see what he did there? The hallmark of any great memoir title is wordplay!

Sometimes a hyphen can really make all the difference.

You see, because not only is Lance out of the band, but also….

Well, I’m certainly not creeped out by all the children on this book’s cover. THAT’S FOR SURE!

You heard the lady. Also, please have a look at the tile of her other book mentioned on the cover.

What exactly are you talking about, Todd Bridges? Read this book to find out!

We get it, Regis. You’re in demand! Or you were around the time “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire” came out.

I know we’re not done with the list yet. But, this is the best title.

Literally everyone gets to write a memoir.

Like, literally everyone.

Even people who are made up.

Of all the books featured in this blog post, this is the one I am most likely to read. Having said that, there is no way I am going to read any of the books featured in this blog post.

KILLING WILLIS??

Also the Colonel Sanders one is perfect.

36 Notes

housingworksbookstore:

emmastraub:

Watch Dan Wilbur and I challenge JK Rowling to a quidditch match. You’re going DOWN, Rowling. Sort of. Maybe. Probably not. And I love you. 

“No, no, you’re supposed to be like, mean.” THIS IS THE BEST! Also, Dan, are you wearing a Housing Works t-shirt!?!

Emma and Dan? Doing stuff? Together? Woo!

32 Notes

I think there’s just an inherent burden of being alive and being a woman. No man would ever admit that, but I think women know it, which is: You know more than men, you know more than most people you’re dealing with every day, and you know that’s it up to you to make things move forward, and you get paid half as much, but you just do it.

RASHIDA JONES REALNESS (via annlf)

Wow. Yes.

5 Notes

I had a boyfriend once, my best friend, and he said, ‘Zoe doesn’t want to be happy.’ And I was totally taken aback by that, because I feel like I’m such a happy person. And I’m trying so hard to be happy. I think emotionally, it just really resonated with me. The script used to be called He Loves Me. I felt like love can be such a burden sometimes. It can be such a bittersweet thing to feel like, ‘Well, he loves me, so what do I have to complain about? But I feel so lonely.’ To feel like being loved is sometimes one of the loneliest feelings in the world, instead of one of the best feelings in the world.

148 Notes

What other job enables a manic-depressive more than one where you can make your own hours, work as little or as much as you want and literally get paid to pursue your obsessions? What other job rewards a stream of consciousness meltdown with the same pageviews and ad revenue as a well-researched piece of investigative journalism? In the business of blog building, craziness breaks through the noise like nothing else. … Well, nothing sews us to our screens like person blogging their own slow meltdown. Nothing seems as raw and authentic as a person writing unfiltered. It just happens that these people write without a filter because they don’t have one. The incentives of blogging reward not having one. The competition for pageviews above all else—because that’s where the money is—creates a race to the bottom that the crazy thrive in. They win because they can always go lower, they have no “line.”

Your Favorite Bloggers are Literally Crazy (And That’s Why They’re Popular)

REALLY want to read this article in full, but it seems to have been taken down? Or moved? Either way, the URL’s not workin’.

8 Notes

Perhaps this, then, is what I meant: my ideal website—and we’ll call it a women’s website (what the hell) because I am a woman—would be one that didn’t make these excuses, writing off fun as “filler” or requiring the premise of friendship in order to raise weightier matters. This website would be one where the editors were willing to assume authority in and for their work, even if it meant sometimes seeming argumentative or unlikeable or wrong. It would be one where good faith could be assumed without gussying everything up in the trappings of intimacy, swaddling tricky subjects in chattiness. These are gestures that seem strange and infantilizing to me, because instant friendship regardless of individuality is the kind of assumption that parents make about children (“They have a daughter your age, you’ll have fun!”) and bosses about subordinates and majorities about minorities, but not one equals in power typically make about one another.

n+1: On Ladyblogs by Molly Fischer

A really well-thought follow-up to her original ladyblog critique that discusses follow-up pieces to critiques, among many other things.

34 Notes

gotagirlcrush:

Welcome to the GAGC bloggin’ gang: Meredith!

She is a comedy-inclined, Brooklyn-based anglophile that also hails from Ohio (Meg and Brooke are also Buckeyes—what can we say, we’re good folk?). 

Check out her tumblr at meredithmo.tumblr.com!

Y’ALL! This is exciting! If you aren’t already following GAGC, do it to it.

1072 Notes

Do it with no hopes of ever making a living at it.
Kelly Oxford on writing and the myth of overnight success (via austinkleon)

112 Notes

When someone sends around a list of potential talent and the list is all men...

maryphillipssandy:

  • When someone sends around a list of potential talent and the list is all men, say “thank you, please also provide some women as options.”
  • When someone complains that it’s hard to find smart, funny female talent (or writers or editors or photographers), say “look harder.” Or hand over a list.
  • Carry a list of good women for when people say there aren’t any.

HELPFUL! And also EXTREMELY RELEVANT! This whole list is so good. Please read it, won’t you?

3 Notes

Letters of Note: He is called Mick Jagger

Anyways the guy on the station, he is called Mick Jagger and all the chicks and the boys meet every Saturday morning in the ‘Carousel’ some juke-joint well one morning in Jan I was walking past and decided to look him up. Everybody’s all over me I get invited to about 10 parties. Beside that Mick is the greatest R&B singer this side of the Atlantic and I don’t mean maybe. I play guitar (electric) Chuck style we got us a bass player and drummer and rhythm-guitar and we practice 2 or 3 nights a week. SWINGIN’.

Of course they’re all rolling in money and in massive detached houses, crazy, one’s even got a butler. I went round there with Mick (in the car of course Mick’s not mine of course) OH BOY ENGLISH IS IMPOSSIBLE.

"Can I get you anything, sir?"

"Vodka and lime, please"

"Certainly, sir"

I really felt like a lord, nearly asked for my coronet when I left.

Oh for Chrissakes this is fantastic.

Keith Richards was hilarious even at 18.

I miss this kind of conversational writing — you see it in letters from ages ago all the time, and now it’s so easy to go back and delete words, even whole passages in emails and Word docs and rephrase to be just right. You never get this kind of stream-of-consciousness stuff any more. Too bad, really.

89 Notes

theatlantic:

Does Mad Men Stay True to ‘60s Language?

It may seem unfair to pick on Mad Men for its language inaccuracies; after all, Shakespeare’s characters spoke highly untraditional English, and great shows like Deadwood routinely ran roughshod over any form of linguistic accuracy. But the careful balance of anachronism, in all its forms, is at the heart of the Mad Men’s mechanics far more than Shakespeare’s. We watch the show to revel in the foreignness of the recent past. The drinking, the smoking, the leering, and even the personal reserve all remind us that the modern world isn’t the only one. (This can be a problem, as Benjamin Schwarz wrote in The Atlantic after season two; it can be hard to be enveloped in a world so deliberately off-putting.) Weiner even deliberately plays with anachronisms: At the very end of the show’s first season, set in 1960, Don Draper returns home hoping to see his picture-perfect family in front of him. Instead he finds an empty house, and the season fades to black to Bob Dylan’s “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right.” It works perfectly well as a score for an abandoned husband; but knowing that the song wasn’t released for another three years adds the weight of the shift in decades to Draper’s plight. Weiner explained the choice to the Times as an attempt to outline the future of the show if it were cancelled.
Given that, the modern sound of Mad Men is certainly a flaw, if a minor one. It makes us feel more at home just where we shouldn’t. That raises an interesting question: can even the most common phrases disturb the environment if the vocabulary is too heavily weighted towards the modern? What seems to be the most ubiquitous mistake in Mad Men is so frequent as to be invisible: the phrase “I need to.” Modern scripts set in 1960s, including Mad Men, use it constantly: it’s about as frequent as everyday words like “good,” “between,” or “most.” But to say “I need to” so much is a surprisingly modern practice: books, television shows, and movies from the 1960s use it at least ten times less often, and many never use it all. Sixties dialogue written back then used “ought to” far more often than modern imitators do. I checked several movies and TV seasons from 1960 to 1965, and all use “ought to” more often than “need to”; every modern show I could find set in the ’60s does the reverse.
Read more. 


I noticed this myself even in the first season. And I specifically remember an internal alarm going off at hearing the word “leverage” in season four (as the article notes).
The language/history nerd in me wishes the writers had tried harder to be accurate, but the fan part of me is more or less OK with it. Shrug!
Good point here:

Even more than anachronism, a core theme of Mad Men is the lost art of personal reserve, self-effacement, and mystery. When Don Draper says, “Tell Jimmy I need to talk to him” in season 2 instead of “I have to talk to him,” it hits a slightly more narcissistic, self-revealing note than it should. A baby boomer might set up a business meeting by invoking his personal needs; but a member of the “silent generation”—particularly one living a double life like Draper—doesn’t talk about himself quite so readily. If Mad Men used “need to” at the 60s rate, all those characteristics would be stronger.

theatlantic:

Does Mad Men Stay True to ‘60s Language?

It may seem unfair to pick on Mad Men for its language inaccuracies; after all, Shakespeare’s characters spoke highly untraditional English, and great shows like Deadwood routinely ran roughshod over any form of linguistic accuracy. But the careful balance of anachronism, in all its forms, is at the heart of the Mad Men’s mechanics far more than Shakespeare’s. We watch the show to revel in the foreignness of the recent past. The drinking, the smoking, the leering, and even the personal reserve all remind us that the modern world isn’t the only one. (This can be a problem, as Benjamin Schwarz wrote in The Atlantic after season two; it can be hard to be enveloped in a world so deliberately off-putting.) Weiner even deliberately plays with anachronisms: At the very end of the show’s first season, set in 1960, Don Draper returns home hoping to see his picture-perfect family in front of him. Instead he finds an empty house, and the season fades to black to Bob Dylan’s “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right.” It works perfectly well as a score for an abandoned husband; but knowing that the song wasn’t released for another three years adds the weight of the shift in decades to Draper’s plight. Weiner explained the choice to the Times as an attempt to outline the future of the show if it were cancelled.

Given that, the modern sound of Mad Men is certainly a flaw, if a minor one. It makes us feel more at home just where we shouldn’t. That raises an interesting question: can even the most common phrases disturb the environment if the vocabulary is too heavily weighted towards the modern? What seems to be the most ubiquitous mistake in Mad Men is so frequent as to be invisible: the phrase “I need to.” Modern scripts set in 1960s, including Mad Men, use it constantly: it’s about as frequent as everyday words like “good,” “between,” or “most.” But to say “I need to” so much is a surprisingly modern practice: books, television shows, and movies from the 1960s use it at least ten times less often, and many never use it all. Sixties dialogue written back then used “ought to” far more often than modern imitators do. I checked several movies and TV seasons from 1960 to 1965, and all use “ought to” more often than “need to”; every modern show I could find set in the ’60s does the reverse.

Read more. 

I noticed this myself even in the first season. And I specifically remember an internal alarm going off at hearing the word “leverage” in season four (as the article notes).

The language/history nerd in me wishes the writers had tried harder to be accurate, but the fan part of me is more or less OK with it. Shrug!

Good point here:

Even more than anachronism, a core theme of Mad Men is the lost art of personal reserve, self-effacement, and mystery. When Don Draper says, “Tell Jimmy I need to talk to him” in season 2 instead of “I have to talk to him,” it hits a slightly more narcissistic, self-revealing note than it should. A baby boomer might set up a business meeting by invoking his personal needs; but a member of the “silent generation”—particularly one living a double life like Draper—doesn’t talk about himself quite so readily. If Mad Men used “need to” at the 60s rate, all those characteristics would be stronger.

147 Notes

Writing is excessive drudgery. It crooks your back, it dims your sight, it twists your stomach and your sides.

Complaints medieval monks scribbled in the margins of Illuminated manuscripts (via explore-blog)

This week, I feel you, monk bros.

Notes

GOOD: A Byline Count for the Next Generation: How Diverse Are the Blogs and Magazines Most Millennials Read?

The media old boys’ club is predictably slow to change. Then again, many of these magazines have a graying subscriber base and were not even founded this century. What about the magazines young people are reading—and making—today? What about the writers we’ll be reading next year, five years from now, 10 years down the line?

Enter GOOD’s own byline count—our accounting of the gender split at magazines and websites Millennials write and read. Outlets like VICE, Rookie, Grantland, and Wired don’t just publish the best writers of our generation—they also serve as a talent pipeline to the established, top-level magazines. Let a Wired byline marinate for a few years, and it could lead to a New Yorker staff writer gig or a GQ cover.

So we picked 10 magazines and websites that are thought leaders among young people—on everything from sports to tech to music to teen culture—and took an inventory. We decided to conduct our count the way we actually read this stuff: One full week of front-page content, online. (See slide 12 for more on our methodology.)

Here’s what we found.

231453 Notes

boesed:

laughinghieroglyphic:

warbyparker:

Whoa. The MLA has officially devised a standard format to cite tweets in an academic paper. Sign of the times.

Hm.

ebooks, Horse. (horse_ebooks). “Leg Butt” 18 Nov 2011, 12:38 PM. Tweet.

boesed:

laughinghieroglyphic:

warbyparker:

Whoa. The MLA has officially devised a standard format to cite tweets in an academic paper. Sign of the times.

Hm.

ebooks, Horse. (horse_ebooks). “Leg Butt” 18 Nov 2011, 12:38 PM. Tweet.